Tech Tip: Sharing the Best Part of the Video

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TECH TIP

Here’s how to cut to the chase and send your friends links to clips that start playback at a specific time.

J. D. Biersdorfer

Q. YouTube’s desktop website has this handy Share setting that lets you share a clip that starts playing later, at a certain part of the video. Is there something similar for clips on Vimeo that I don’t see?

A. Although the Vimeo site doesn’t have the same onscreen options that YouTube does, you can also share links to its videos that are set to start playing at a certain point. The first step is to figure out the specific spot, or timecode, where you want the clip to begin.

Once you have established the starting point — for example, two minutes and 13 seconds into the clip — you need to add this information to the end of the clip’s Vimeo URL.

Click or tap into the address bar, and at the very end of the URL, type “#t=” and then “2m13s” (without the quotation marks) to indicate that the starting time code is two minutes and 13 seconds from the beginning.

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To share a Vimeo video that starts playback at a specific point, add the minutes and seconds from the clip’s timecode to the URL and send it as a link.CreditThe New York Times

Do not use spaces between the original URL and the new timecode information you just added. The new URL (which now looks like https://vimeo.com/192298842#t=2m13s), is the version you share with friends.

You can also add a timecode notation to the end of URLs for YouTube clips this way, but for those who have not tried it yet, YouTube has a feature that can save you the typing. When you are watching a clip on the site and get to the place in the video that you’d like a friend to start watching, click the Share button under the video window.

At the bottom of the Share box, click the box next to “Start at:” in front of the displayed timecode. The URL shown right above has updated itself to add the new starting point, which you can then copy, post or share with friends.


Personal Tech invites questions about computer-based technology to techtip@nytimes.com. This column will answer questions of general interest, but letters cannot be answered individually.

J.D. Biersdorfer has been answering technology questions — in print, on the web, in audio and in video — since 1998. She also writes the Sunday Book Review’s “Applied Reading” column on ebooks and literary apps, among other things. @jdbiersdorfer

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